5 Linux Commands Everyone Should Know

We use Linux a lot at Punch Drunk. We have also discovered that most people use Linux extensively in their daily lives. From android phones to smart refrigerators, we are surrounded by devices at that run some flavor of Linux. With that in mind, we decided to share some of our favorite terminal commands with you.

1. Change Directory (cd)

The change directory command (‘cd‘) is how you move from one place to another inside your computer. Some would argue that this is the most important command to know. Being able to move around the operating system is paramount in getting things done with your computer. Below you will see some examples of the change directory command at work.

 

2. Manual (man)

The Manual command (‘man‘) brings up the manual for any program or command with a manual currently installed on your Linux machine. This can be helpful if you need a bit more information about how something works or the arguments it can take. Below are some examples of the manual command in action.

 

 

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Example of manual output for ‘ls’ command. To close just press ‘q’.

 

3. The List Command (ls)

The List command (‘ls‘) Is how you see what files and folders are currently living in your working directory.

There is so much these commands can do. For a complete list of all the things the list command can do check out this website.

 

4. The Move Command (mv)

The move command (‘mv‘) does exactly what it says. It moves a file from one place to another. This is the equivalent of dragging things around on the desktop into folders. Below you can see some example uses of the move command.

 

5. The Super User Command (sudo or su)

The Super User commands are some of the most powerful ways to get things done on your Linux box. If you ever try running a command, and it fails, try running it again with (‘sudo‘). This will often make something work that you didn’t have permissions for as a regular user. As part of the built-in security features of most Linux operating systems, you will need to have a root password to add, remove, update, or install software or important files.

 

 

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